Sober Living Through the Final Days of COVID-19

Relapse occurs when someone returns to substance use after a period of abstinence. Relapse is most common during the first year of recovery but even people with years of sobriety can resume a self-destructive habit of drug use or drinking. Addiction is a brain disorder that causes people to engage in compulsive substance abuse, despite knowing the consequences. The road to recovery takes time, practice and dedication; a relapse does not mean you have failed. It is a common setback most people in recovery experience. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 40 to 60 percent of people in recovery from substance abuse, relapse.

After leaving an addiction treatment program, most individuals expect to return to their normal environments where they once relied on substances. Certain places, people, and things from a person’s past can bring forth memories of substance abuse, which may induce urges to continue old habits of abuse. There are a number of reasons that can lead an individual to relapsing, even after addiction treatment.

Triggers
Triggers are thoughts, feelings, sensations, situations, and relationships that refer to the experience of having an emotional reaction to past situations – that can often aid in someone wanting to drink or use drugs after a period of abstinence.

The Cocaine and Methamphetamine Rise in Philadelphia

Relapse occurs when someone returns to substance use after a period of abstinence. Relapse is most common during the first year of recovery but even people with years of sobriety can resume a self-destructive habit of drug use or drinking. Addiction is a brain disorder that causes people to engage in compulsive substance abuse, despite knowing the consequences. The road to recovery takes time, practice and dedication; a relapse does not mean you have failed. It is a common setback most people in recovery experience. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 40 to 60 percent of people in recovery from substance abuse, relapse.

After leaving an addiction treatment program, most individuals expect to return to their normal environments where they once relied on substances. Certain places, people, and things from a person’s past can bring forth memories of substance abuse, which may induce urges to continue old habits of abuse. There are a number of reasons that can lead an individual to relapsing, even after addiction treatment.

Triggers
Triggers are thoughts, feelings, sensations, situations, and relationships that refer to the experience of having an emotional reaction to past situations – that can often aid in someone wanting to drink or use drugs after a period of abstinence.

Staying Sober During the Holidays

Relapse occurs when someone returns to substance use after a period of abstinence. Relapse is most common during the first year of recovery but even people with years of sobriety can resume a self-destructive habit of drug use or drinking. Addiction is a brain disorder that causes people to engage in compulsive substance abuse, despite knowing the consequences. The road to recovery takes time, practice and dedication; a relapse does not mean you have failed. It is a common setback most people in recovery experience. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 40 to 60 percent of people in recovery from substance abuse, relapse.

After leaving an addiction treatment program, most individuals expect to return to their normal environments where they once relied on substances. Certain places, people, and things from a person’s past can bring forth memories of substance abuse, which may induce urges to continue old habits of abuse. There are a number of reasons that can lead an individual to relapsing, even after addiction treatment.

Triggers
Triggers are thoughts, feelings, sensations, situations, and relationships that refer to the experience of having an emotional reaction to past situations – that can often aid in someone wanting to drink or use drugs after a period of abstinence.